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Words to describe someone's voice

  • adenoidal: if someone’s voice is adenoidal, some of the sound seems to come through their nose
  • appealing: an appealing look, voice etc shows that you want help, approval, or agreement
  • breathy: with loud breathing noises
  • brittle: if you speak in a brittle voice, you sound as if you are about to cry
  • croaky: if someone’s voice sounds croaky, they speak in a low rough voice that sounds as if they have a sore throat
  • dead: if someone’s eyes are dead, or if their voice is dead, they feel or show no emotion
  • disembodied: a disembodied voice comes from someone who you cannot see
  • flat: spoken in a voice that does not go up and down. This word is often used for describing the speech of people from a particular region.
  • fruity: a fruity voice or laugh is deep and strong in a pleasant way
  • grating: a grating voice, laugh, or sound is unpleasant and annoying
  • gravelly: a gravelly voice sounds low and rough
  • gruff: a gruff voice has a rough low sound
  • guttural: a guttural sound is deep and made at the back of your throat
  • high-pitched: a high-pitched voice or sound is very high
  • hoarse: someone who is hoarse or has a hoarse voice speaks in a low rough voice, usually because their throat is sore
  • honeyed: honeyed words or a honeyed voice sound very nice but you cannot trust the person who is speaking
  • husky: a husky voice is deep and sounds hoarse (=as if you have a sore throat), often in an attractive way
  • low adjective: a low voice or sound is quiet and difficult to hear
  • low adverb: in a deep voice, or with a deep sound
  • matter-of-fact: used about someone’s behaviour or voice
  • modulated: a modulated voice is controlled and pleasant to listen to
  • monotonous: a monotonous sound or voice is boring and unpleasant because it does not change in loudness or become higher or lower
  • nasal: someone with a nasal voice sounds as if they are speaking through their nose
  • orotund: an orotund voice is loud and clear
  • penetrating: a penetrating voice or sound is so high or loud that it makes you slightly uncomfortable
  • plummy: a plummy voice or way of speaking is considered to be typical of an English person of a high social class. This word shows that you dislike people who speak like this.
  • quietly: in a quiet voice
  • raucous: a raucous voice or noise is loud and sounds rough
  • ringing: a ringing sound or voice is very loud and clear
  • rough: a rough voice is not soft and is unpleasant to listen to
  • shrill: a shrill noise or voice is very loud, high, and unpleasant
  • silvery: a silvery voice or sound is clear, light, and pleasant
  • singsong: if you speak in a singsong voice, your voice rises and falls in a musical way
  • small: a small voice or sound is quiet
  • smoky: a smoky voice or smoky eyes are sexually attractive in a slightly mysterious way
  • softly spoken: someone who is softly spoken has a quiet gentle voice
  • sotto voce adjective, adverb: in a very quiet voice
  • stentorian: a stentorian voice sounds very loud and severe
  • strangled: a strangled sound is one that someone stops before they finish making it
  • strangulated: strangled
  • strident: a strident voice or sound is loud and unpleasant
  • taut: used about something such as a voice or expression that shows someone is nervous or angry
  • thick: if your voice is thick with an emotion, it sounds less clear than usual because of the emotion
  • thickly: with a low voice that comes mostly from your throat
  • thin: a thin voice or sound is high and unpleasant to listen to
  • throaty: a throaty sound is low and seems to come from deep in your throat
  • tight: a tight voice or expression shows that you are nervous or annoyed
  • toneless: a toneless voice does not express any emotion
  • tremulous: if something such as your voice or smile is tremulous, it is not steady, for example because you are afraid or excited
  • wheezy: a wheezy noise sounds as if it is made by someone who has difficulty breathing
  • wobbly: if your voice is wobbly, it goes up and down, usually because you are frightened, not confident, or are going to cry
fyeahdenstiel

hard-y-addicted:

thetatteredendsofautumn:

goddessofcheese:

vulpesinculta:

Are you still stuck for ideas for National Novel Writing Month? Or are you working on a novel at a more leisurely pace? Here are 102 resources on Character, Point of View, Dialogue, Plot, Conflict, Structure, Outlining, Setting, and World Building, plus some links to generate Ideas and Inspiration.

CHARACTER, POINT OF VIEW, DIALOGUE

10 Days of Character Building

Name Generators

Name Playground

The Universal Mary Sue Litmus Test

Priming the idea pump (A character checklist shamlessly lifted from acting)

How to Create a Character

Seven Common Character Types

Handling a Cast of Thousands – Part I: Getting to Know Your Characters

It’s Not What They Say …

Establishing the Right Point of View: How to Avoid “Stepping Out of Character”

How to Start Writing in the Third Person

Web Resources for Developing Characters

What are the Sixteen Master Archetypes?

Character: A compilation of guidance from classical and contemporary experts on creating great dramatic characters

Building Fictional Characters

Fiction Writer’s Character Chart

Character Building Workshop

Tips for Characterization

Fiction Writer’s Character Chart

Villains are People, Too, But …

Top 10 Tips for Writing Dialogue

Speaking of Dialogue

Dialogue Tips

Advantages, Disadvantages and Skills (character traits)

How to Write a Character Bible

Character Development Exercises

All Your Characters Sounds the Same — And They’re Not a Hivemind!

Medieval Names Archive

Sympathy Without Saintliness

Writing the Other: Bridging Cultural Difference for Successful Fiction

Family Echo (family tree website)

Interviewing Characters: Follow the Energy

100 Character Development Questions for Writers

Behind the Name

Lineage Chart Layout Generator

PLOT, CONFLICT, STRUCTURE, OUTLINE

How to Write a Novel: The Snowflake Method

Effectively Outlining Your Plot

Conflict and Character within Story Structure

Outlining Your Plot

Ideas, Plots & Using the Premise Sheets

How to Write a Novel

Creating Conflict and Sustaining Suspense

Plunge Right In … Into Your Story, That Is!

Fiction Writing Tips: Story Grid

Tips for Creating a Compelling Plot

Writer’s “Cheat Sheets”

The Thirty-six (plus one) Dramatic Situations

The Evil Overlord Devises a Plot: Excerpt from Stupid Plotting Tricks

Conflict Test

What is Conflict?

Monomyth

The Hero’s Journey: Summary of the Steps

Outline Your Novel in Thirty Minutes

Plotting Without Fears

Novel Outlining 101

Writing the Perfect Scene

Fight Scenes 101

Basic Plots in Literature

One-Page Plotting

The Great Swampy Middle

SETTING, WORLD BUILDING

Magical World Builder’s Guide

I Love the End of the World

World Building 101

The Art of Description: Eight Tips to Help You Bring Your Settings to Life

Creating the Perfect Setting – Part I

Creating a Believable World

An Impatient Writer’s Approach to Worldbuilding

Fantasy Worldbuilding Questions

Setting

Character and Setting Interactions

Creating Fantasy and Science Fiction Worlds

Creating Fantasy Worlds

Questions About Worldbuilding

Maps Workshop — Developing the Fictional World Through Mapping

World Builder Projects

IDEAS, INSPIRATION

Quick Story Idea Generator

Solve Your Problems Simply by Saying Them Out Loud

Busting Your Writing Rut

Writing Inspiration, or Sex on a Bicycle

Creative Acceleration: 11 Tips to Engineer a Productive Flow

The Seven Major Beginner Mistakes

Complete Your First Book with these 9 Simple Writing Habits

Free Association, Active Imagination, Twilight Imaging

Random Book Title Generator

Finishing Your Novel

Story Starters and Idea Generators

REVISION

How to Rewrite

One-Pass Manuscript Revision: From First Draft to Last in One Cycle

Editing Recipe

Cliche Finder

Revising Your Novel: Read What You’ve Written

Writing 101: So You Want to Write a Novel Part 3: Revising a Novel

TOOLS and SOFTWARE

My Writing Nook (online text editor; free)

Bubbl.us (online mind map application; free)

Freemind (mind map application; free; Windows, Mac, Linux, portable)

XMind (mind map application; free; Windows, Mac, Linux, portable)

Liquid Story Binder (novel organization and writing software; free trial, $45.95; Windows, portable)

Scrivener (novel organization and writing software; free trial, $39.95; Mac)

SuperNotecard (novel organization and writing software; free trial, $29; Windows, Mac, Linux, portable)

yWriter (novel organization and writing software; free; Windows, Linux, portable)

JDarkRoom (minimalist text editor; free; Windows, Mac, Linux, portable)

AutoRealm (map creation software; free; Windows, Linux with Wine)

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YAY

booklover
I think a writer’s job is to provoke questions. I like to think that if someone’s read a book of mine, they’ve had—I don’t know what—the literary equivalent of a shower. Something that would start them thinking in a slightly different way perhaps. That’s what I think writers are for. This is what our function is. We spend all our time thinking about how things work, why things happen, which means that we are more sensitive to what’s going on.